Halloween Animals We Love to Fear 5

Halloween is Friday, October 31st – and we save the best for last…

spider collage(ok, maybe these really are creepy!)

Eight legs, eight eyes and a face only a mother can love.  Arachnids.  Spiders and scorpions strike fear into the bravest hearts. The tarantula considered the most frightening spider on earth and thankfully we don’t have them in Central Oregon. There are three poisonous spiders you do need to watch out for at The Cove:

poisonous spiders

No Haunted house would ever be complete without creepy spiders and miles of webs stretched across every possible surface.  While I’m not hoping to convince all of you to like spiders;  there are some interesting facts to share.
• Spiders are insectivores and eat all kinds of bugs including wasps and hornets.
• They are typically nocturnal. Most gardeners welcome spiders because they are like having a pest control service that works 24/7 for free.
• Many do not spin webs.
• You are most likely to see spiders in the late summer or early fall because that is mating season for many spiders.
• Spiders are considered a delicacy for many in Asian and South American countries; scorpions, tarantulas and spiders are eaten.
• Spider venom is used in neurological research and may prevent permanent brain damage in stroke victims.
• The silk produced by spiders is used in many optical devices including laboratory instruments.
• Some birds, like the hummingbird, use silk to hold their nests together.

Warning:  Spiders like to be in dark, tight spaces.  Be especially careful reaching into rocks, woodpiles, attics and closets.

scorpion with moth
Fossil records show that scorpions are one of the oldest invertebrates on earth. There are 1,500 different scorpions in the world, 5 are found in Oregon. Baby scorpions are born alive and mom carries all of them around on her back. Scorpions are very sensitive to UV light and often will not leave their borrows even on a full moon – the coolest thing about scorpions, they glow green under black light.

glowing scoprion
Whether our fears stem from urban legends or real-life encounters, it’s normal to be scared of wild animals that could cause you physical harm. But some animals get a bad reputation, thanks to tall-tales or out-and-out myths that just won’t go away. Even if you’re not crazy about some of the animals we talked about in this post; hopefully you will not fear the unknown.  So this Halloween, don’t be cringe when you look at all the creepy animals around a haunted house, smile knowing so many animals are out there helping us.

Happy Halloween!

About coveranger

"One's happiness depends less on what he knows than on what he feels." - Liberty Hyde Bailey

Posted on October 27, 2014, in Environmental Education, seasons, Wildlife and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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